Successfully Navigating Your Onboarding Journey

A Guide from Google PM for the First 30/60/90 Days in Any Company

Keith Chen

--

Image generated by DALL·E 2

Starting a new job can be an exciting and nerve-wracking experience, and believe it or not, I have done it myself 5 times in the past 8 years. Since I earned my MBA back in 2015, I have worked in multiple industries, from heavy industry (Eaton Corp.) and banking (PNC Financial Services), to e-commerce and cloud computing (Oracle, Amazon, and currently at Google). From all these experiences, I learned that it’s important to make the most of your onboarding period to establish a strong foundation and set yourself up for success.

In this article, we will guide you through managing your onboarding in a new company, highlighting key strategies and goals for the first 30, 60, and 90 days.

The First 30 Days: Building Relationships and Absorbing Knowledge

During the initial 30 days, focus on getting to know your colleagues, understanding the company culture, and gaining a solid understanding of your role and responsibilities. Allow me to share a personal story to illustrate the significance of this period.

When I first joined the banking industry, I was eager to make a positive impression. During my first few weeks, I actively sought opportunities to connect with my colleagues. I introduced myself to team members, joined coffee chats, and engaged in casual conversations during lunch breaks. These interactions not only helped me build relationships but also provided valuable insights into the company’s dynamics and culture.

Additionally, I devoted time to understanding the company’s processes and policies. I attended orientation sessions, reached out to my manager and peers whenever I had questions, and meticulously read through the documents suggested by my manager and peers. Especially in banking, it is important to understand all the different teams that I need to collaborate with (e.g. legal, risk, governance, marketing, etc.). This proactive approach allowed me to grasp the organizational structure, expectations, and protocols, enabling me to navigate my role more effectively.

The Next 30 Days: Taking Initiative and Demonstrating Value

--

--

Keith Chen

Photographer, Product Manager @ Google, Professor, Runner, Hiker, and World Traveler. Took photos from 50+ cities (and counting). Language : 中文 / EN